My Blog

Posts for: June, 2018

By H. Paul Walls, DMD
June 28, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: loose teeth  
ThePerilsofaLoosePermanentTooth-andWhattodoAboutit

A loose baby tooth is normal and expected; a loose permanent tooth is quite another matter: it’s an advanced sign of disease that could lead to losing the tooth.

The reasons for its looseness may vary. You may have experienced “primary occlusal trauma,” in which the teeth have experienced a prolonged excessive biting force beyond their tolerance. This can be caused by habitual grinding or clenching the teeth.

You may have also experienced “secondary occlusal trauma”: although the biting forces are within normal ranges, the teeth still can’t handle the stress due to degraded bone support and gum tissue detachment. Clenching habits combined with weakened bone and gums will only accelerate and worsen the damage.

The most frequent cause in adults for loose teeth is secondary trauma from periodontal (gum) disease. Bacterial plaque built up on teeth from poor oral hygiene causes a chronic infection that eventually weakens gum attachment to the teeth. A loose tooth is a late sign of this damage.

Treatment for disease-based loose teeth has a twofold approach. First, we thoroughly clean the tooth, root and gum surfaces of all plaque and calculus (hardened plaque deposits) to reduce the infection and inflammation and restore tissue health. This is often accompanied by antibiotic treatments to reduce bacteria below the gum tissue.

For the loose teeth themselves, we may need to modify the forces against them while the gums and bone heal. One way to lessen the biting force on a tooth is to reshape its and the opposing tooth’s biting surfaces. For extensive looseness we can also splint the affected tooth or teeth with other teeth. Temporarily, we can apply splinting material to the outside of both the loose and stable teeth or cut a small channel into them and apply bonding material to join them. A permanent option is to crown both the affected teeth and nearby stable teeth and fuse the crowns together.

These and other stabilizing techniques, like occlusal night guards to reduce the effects of teeth grinding or orthodontic treatment, will help secure the teeth. Coupled with disease treatment and renewed dental care and hygiene practices, you may be able to keep that loose tooth from being lost.

If you would like more information on treating loose teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Treatment for Loose Teeth.”


By H. Paul Walls, DMD
June 18, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry  
TipsforPicture-PerfectSummerSmiles

June is the month when lots of important events happen—like weddings, graduations, and family get-togethers. When the weather turns balmy and the days get longer, it’s the perfect time for a celebration…and today it’s easier than ever to capture those special moments in pictures that will be treasured for years to come. Are you ready for your close-up?

Both professional photographers and dentists want to help you look your best when you’re smiling for the camera. Here are a few suggestions from both kinds of pros for capturing a great-looking smile.

Tilt your head just a bit

Instead of looking straight at the camera, try turning or tilting your head slightly. This often presents a more flattering angle, and can hide small facial asymmetries. If your face has a “good side” (you can check by looking in a mirror), be sure to make it visible. But even if your head is tilted or turned, your eyes should be looking at the camera.

Moisten teeth before the shutter clicks

A sparkly smile is the most appealing one. Just before the picture is snapped, run your tongue over your teeth to give them a little extra shine. Highlights in the teeth, lips and eyes add liveliness to your portrait.

Relax—Don’t clench your teeth!

It’s better to smile naturally—perhaps with teeth slightly parted, or lips in a more relaxed position—than to force yourself to make an artificial-looking grin. Try recalling things that make you joyful, or think of people you care about, and chances are your natural smile will shine out.

Have your teeth professionally cleaned at the dental office

Before the big event, you can ensure that your smile looks its best with a professional cleaning at our office. This treatment removes layers of plaque and tartar on visible tooth surfaces, as well as between teeth and under the gumline. It not only makes teeth look their best, but it’s also an effective way to fight tooth decay and gum disease. And while you’re here, it’s the perfect time to talk about any cosmetic issues that may be troubling you about your smile. With treatments like teeth whitening, cosmetic bonding or dental veneers, we can help you get the smile you’ve always wanted.

If you would like more information about professional teeth cleaning or cosmetic dentistry, please call our office to schedule a consultation.


4ReasonsYouShouldBeginYourChildsDentalVisitsbyAgeOne

As a parent, you have plenty of questions about your child’s health. One we hear quite often is when dental care should begin for a child.

The short answer is when their first tooth comes in, usually at six months to a year of age: that’s when you should begin brushing at home. But there’s also the matter of when to begin your child’s regular dental visits: we recommend the first visit around the child’s first birthday. Here are 4 reasons why this is the right time to start.

Prevention. First and foremost, starting visits at age one gives your child the best start for preventing tooth decay through cleanings, topical fluoride or, in some cases, sealants. Preventive care for primary teeth may not seem that important since they’ll eventually give way to the permanent teeth. But primary teeth also serve as guides for the next teeth’s ultimate position in the mouth — if a primary tooth is lost prematurely, it could affect your child’s bite in later years.

Development. Early dental visits give us a chance to keep an eye on bite and jaw development. If we notice a developing malocclusion (bad bite) or conditions favorable for it, we can refer you to an orthodontist for consultation or interventional therapy to reduce the possibility or extent of future treatment.

Support. Your child’s regular dental visits can also help you as a parent. We can advise you on all aspects of dental care, including brushing and flossing techniques, nutrition dos and don’ts, and how to handle situations like late thumb sucking.

Familiarization. Dental visits starting at age one will help your child become familiar and comfortable with visiting the dentist that might be more difficult to achieve if they’re older. Dental visit anxiety is a major reason why many people don’t maintain regular visits later in life. Children who come to realize that dental visits are a normal, even pleasant experience are more likely to continue the practice into adulthood.

Caring for your child’s teeth is just as important as other aspects of their health. Getting an early start can head off brewing problems now and set the course for healthy teeth and gums tomorrow.

If you would like more information on pediatric dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Age One Dental Visit.”